Pastry Dough

Pastry Dough
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Using a food processor makes short work of pastry dough. This recipe makes enough for two 9 - 11 regular or deep dish pie or tart. Left over pastry may be rolled out and cut into shapes to garnish the pie. Perfect for both sweet and savory pies. The dough can be made up to 3 days in advance and refrigerated or wrapped tightly and frozen for up to 3 months.
Prep Time
10minutes
Passive Time
30minutes
Prep Time
10minutes
Passive Time
30minutes
Pastry Dough
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Using a food processor makes short work of pastry dough. This recipe makes enough for two 9 - 11 regular or deep dish pie or tart. Left over pastry may be rolled out and cut into shapes to garnish the pie. Perfect for both sweet and savory pies. The dough can be made up to 3 days in advance and refrigerated or wrapped tightly and frozen for up to 3 months.
Prep Time
10minutes
Passive Time
30minutes
Prep Time
10minutes
Passive Time
30minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
Units:
Instructions
  1. Insert the metal blade into the work bowl of the food processor. Process flour, salt and baking powder, about 10 seconds. Add well chilled butter and lard. Use short pulses until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs about the size of a pea. about 15 - 20 pulses. If some larger chunks of butter remain, that is fine. Do not over process.
  2. Sprinkle 4 tablespoons of ice cold water on the flour / butter mixture, then pulse 5 - 6 times. The dough will be crumbly, but should start to hold together. Sprinkle on more water, a teaspoon or two at a time, with two to three quick pulses between each addition. adding just enough water for the dough to hold together easily when pressed into a ball. Do not overwork the dough and do not allow the dough to form a ball in the food processor. Add liquid sparingly so that the dough is not sticky.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Press together into a ball, divide the dough in half and then flatten into two discs, about 6 inches in diameter. Smooth the edges of the discs by rolling them on the work surface like a wheel. Wrap the dough tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 3 days.
  4. When ready to make the pie, remove the dough from the refrigerator and allow to soften a bit, it should still be cold to the touch. Place the dough on a lightly floured work surface, a silicone mat works well. Roll dough to the desired width, working from the inside out, turning in quarter turns to create a circle.
  5. Gently fold dough over the rolling pin and place into pie pan. Lift the edge of the dough and gently pat the pastry to fit down into the pan. If making a single crust pie, cut the dough just a bit larger than the pie pan and fold the edges under, then crimp as desired.
  6. If making a double crust pie, place the pie pan in the refrigerator to chill while rolling out the top crust, as directed above. Fill pie with filling, place top crust on the pie, cut excess pastry and press the crust together, crimp as desired. Make a couple of slits in the top to allow steam to escape while baking. Return pie to the refrigerator to chill while oven preheats.
  7. Cold dough and a hot oven are the secret to a light, tender crust. Many recipes call for starting at 425 degrees for 20 minutes and then reduce oven temperature to 375 for about 30 - 40 minutes or until you see filling bubbling inside the pie.
Recipe Notes
  • I use an 11 cup Cuisinart food processor.
  • The resting time is needed to allow the gluten to relax preventing the pastry from shrinking in the pie pan.
  • If using un-salted butter increase salt to 1 teaspoon.
  • Using high quality butter with a low water content produces a flaky tender crust.
  • * Cold shortening may be used instead of lard.
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About Baking Nana

Each morning my granddaughter Sarah calls to ask, "Watcha doing, Nana? Are you baking Nana?" Hence my "name" Baking Nana. I am a mother to three wonderful children and a grandmother to 12 very hungry grandkids. I don't bake fancy cakes but I do make wonderful yeast bread and home cooked meals made with love.

Comments

Pastry Dough — 2 Comments

  1. Your crust doesn’t look anything like what I’ve made in the past. I’ll have to try again sometime soon. Your instructions are perfect.

    • Does your dough crack or crumble? It might need a bit more water. This is very easy to roll out. Using two types of fat helps that.
      I hope you give it a try, let me know how it goes.

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